Letter from MM. de Gasparin, Martin, Cochin, and Laboulaye, to the Loyal Publication Society of New York Mary L Booth

ISBN: 9781331384809

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

24 pages


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Letter from MM. de Gasparin, Martin, Cochin, and Laboulaye, to the Loyal Publication Society of New York  by  Mary L Booth

Letter from MM. de Gasparin, Martin, Cochin, and Laboulaye, to the Loyal Publication Society of New York by Mary L Booth
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 24 pages | ISBN: 9781331384809 | 6.14 Mb

Excerpt from Letter From MM. De Gasparin, Martin, Cochin, and Laboulaye, to the Loyal Publication Society of New YorkFor the present, they must be given up unconditionally to the absolute power of their old master- for we cannot interfere with theMoreExcerpt from Letter From MM.

De Gasparin, Martin, Cochin, and Laboulaye, to the Loyal Publication Society of New YorkFor the present, they must be given up unconditionally to the absolute power of their old master- for we cannot interfere with the latter without fettering the independence of the Southern States, restricting their constitutional jurisdiction, offending their susceptibilities, and delaying or endangering their return.With a logic, the cold and inflexible rigor of which appals us, Mr. Johnson has proceeded toward the single end which he has proposed to himself.

Like a man who throws aside one of the data of the problem to be solved, he has boldly drawn up his political formulas.Congress passes the Freedmens Bureau Bill- Mr. Johnson does not stop to consider whether the poor blacks, placed face to face with the Southern government and the Southern courts, will have any chance whatever of obtaining justice- it suffices for him that the bill belongs to that side of the question which he is determined not to know, and he vetoes it without proposing any more moderate one in its place.

The important point is to suppress all federal protection. Perish the negroes, if they are an obstacle to the re-establishment of the Union!Another bill is adopted by Congress. This time, the point in question is only to secure civil rights to the freedmen - the right to buy, sell, and hold property, to marry, to be under the jurisdiction of the common law, to be subject to common penalties.

No matter, this also belongs to the side of the question which Mr. Johnson persists in ignoring- this is in opposition to his theory- this would irritate the South- this would give rise to the eventual interference of the central power- and the veto recommences its work.This veto has been overruled, as we know, by a two-third majority of both Houses of Congress, which nothing has succeeded in shaking. But the fact that it has been possible for affairs to come to such a pass, suffices to measure the enormity of the error into which Mr. Johnson has fallen.

See how far the South, patronized by Mr. Johnson, now pushes it pretensions! See to what a point it proposes to maintain slavery! Those who doubted that emancipation, deprived of its practical results, was a lying delusion, know henceforth on what to rely.

The last veto has thrown light on what was before obscure- none can longer hesitate. The necessity of putting an end to the negro question has assumed the character of a self-evident axiom.III.This necessity Mr. Johnson denies, or rather systematically forgets. He talks plausibly of the duty of being just to the South, but he forgets the duty of being just to the men who have shed their blood to suppress the rebellion of the South.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

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